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, the folks that were elected with us, the senators that have arrived in the last five or ten years. i think we have the ability to respond in a big, bold way to the crises that face us. and i know senator merkley, you came here a young man with senator hatfield i believe and you saw a different senate. maybe you could talk about that and we don't want to stay, i know we're going to a caucus and we have our generous chair here, so we don't want to keep her up there too long, our presiding officer. anyway, senator merkley, i yield. mr. merkley: i think my colleague from new mexico is absolutely right in pointing out there were periods when the senate really worked to address the big issues facing america. and it wawnltd that there weren't -- wasn't that there weren't profound differences. there were fierce differences, emotional differences, deep differences but folks came to this floor, they conversed, they laid out their arguments and ultimately they made decisions about which way to go. and they didn't bring the attitude let's just paralyze this chamber from doing doing nothing. had they d
as it was four years ago. make sure you know that what we are celebrating is not the election or swearing in of a president, what we are doing is celebrating each other. and celebrating this incredible nation that we call home. and after we celebrate, let's make sure to work as hard as we can to pass on an america that is worthy, not only of our past, but also of our future. god bless you. i love you. we will see you tomorrow. [applause] ♪ ["we take care of our own"] ♪ ♪ ["only in america"] ♪ >> as part of our inauguration fightge, the u.s. army's and drum corps -- they will escort president obama down pennsylvania avenue during the inaugural parade. ♪ [drum line] >> it began in april with the production team. it prepares the materials, the music, the drill that we do. parade marching does not require quadrilles, but we do a great deal of research with 18th-century music portrayed on modern instruments that aren't -- that are reminiscent of instruments during the revolutionary war. the rangers a range of vignettes -- are arranged vignettes music from the 18th century that has m
elected officials. i won. i won. i am far less naive today than i was four years ago but far more certain today who i am and where i want to take this country over the next four years. basically, that's what that peach was. >> what's the practical fact, he talked about climate change. he won't pass cap and trade through the house. >> when i heard that line, what struck me is this is the obama-care of the second ad administration. climate change is the sleeping dog issue that he is going to be what he will fashion piecemeal. i think that will be part of the second term legacy what he gets done. not so much the social stuff a lot of people certainly in the conservative movement concern themselves with, the bigger idea that falls into that broader vision. he reformed one six of the nation's economy with health care. now, he will go to the next level with global change on the environment. i see that as a sleeper and agree it was a very progressive speech. the idea he's putting a period on the reagan period saying this is a new day, we're going a new way and these are the agenda items i will t
to washington, you already paid for it. well, this is the day they all voted for. and this country elected this president, elections matter, everyone who went to the polling place went to the trouble of getting involved in this campaign. it's getting the reality of it to come true today. i am curious, i know the president is committed to do something about public safety. we can see that in his heart since newtown. we know he wants to do something on immigration because the there to be fixed and both parties want to deal with it fur all kinds of reasons. i'm waiting to see if there's a halfton in his speech today, something about rebuilding this country. i think this president's instincts are good on war and peace. i hope they are good about building this country. i wish the labor unions and all kinds of people would get out to say, let's do what we did when eisenhower was president, a moderate republican. build this country up, rebuild our highways, our bridges, our big cities and transit systems, inner city transportation, really build up this country with jobs. all this talk about debt,
and losers of elections move on with their lives of dignity. we thank you again for the inspiration of our nation's founders and the legacy they left us with. may the members of this assembly and all americans be worthy of that legacy. may all that is done this day be for your greater honor and glory. amen. the speaker: the chair has examined the journal of the last day's proceedings and announces to the house his approval thereof. pursuant to clause 1 of rule 1 the journal stands approved. the pledge of allegiance today will be led by the gentleman from michigan, mr. walberg. mr. walberg: please join together in the pledge. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will entertain one-minute speeches at a later time today. pursuant to section 5-a of house resolution 5, the chair now recognizes the gentleman from virginia, mr. goodlatte, for the reading of the constitution. mr. goodlatte: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, this morning
the election of the first african-american president. president obama is only the 16th sitting chief executive to be returned to office. he is the first president since dwight eisenhower to win two consecutive elections with more than 51% of the popular vote. he won for the 372 electoral votes to mitt romney's 206 and spent part of the morning at the white house having coffee with bipartisan leadership. >> this is the second time the president had his inauguration on the celebration of martin luther king, jr. and it's actually a ceremonial event. the 20th amendment to the constitution mandates that newly elected mandates take place on january 20th and several times that happened on the sunday. and followed by the pomp and pageantry on the following monday. >> both president obama and vice president biden took their official oaths of office why yesterday. >> i barack hussein obama swear -- >> supreme court justice john roberts swore in the first family. justice sotomayor did the honor at the vice president's residence at the united states naval observe tore in washington. >> and both families a
magnitude imperilled by the election to the presidency of an anti-slavery man by abraham lincoln, he meant, the people of the southern states were driven to the adoption of some course of action to avert the danger with which they were openly menaced. and that course of action, of course, was leaving the federal union. davis was not overstating the stakes for him if his fellow -- for him and his fellow slave owners, the more than 12 million souls who resided in the southern states in 1860. nearly one out of three of those people was enslaved, was owned outright by other people. and on the markets of the day, those nearly four million human beings were worth something like $3 billion. that was an immense sum at the time. it was a sum greater than the value of all the farmland in all the states of the south. it was a sum fully three times as great as the cost of constructing all the railroads that then ran throughout all the united states. to give you some idea of just what those human bodies were worth. but even more important to southern wealth than the sale price of these human bodies was
are up for re-election in north carolina or out west or down south or wherever they're from, i don't think he can lift it. and can that's what i'm talking about in terms of overreach. if this was something where you said close the loophole on gun shows, catch the 40% of people who are going into the shows and escaping, buying guns if they're mentally disturbed and we should catch that and reasonable restrictions. the problem in the heller case and what d.c. was doing is they said you couldn't have a gun unless you registered it, but then today wouldn't let you register it. i mean, that's an effective you can't do it. and that does, in fact, go too far. so if it's a common sense -- and, you know, quite frankly, i don't know why ten. i don't know why somebody needs ten bullets, let alone thirty. so ten doesn't seem like some magic number to me. and, again, to the gun owners, that sounds like something somebody made up, ten. so i think that the president'stive orders -- executive orders can be accepted by the republican party, and if they did the incremental approach of background che
"the five" thinks about it. this is a moment you predicted on election day what happened. what are your thoughts overall? >> bob: as a progressive, a great populist speech. it would remind me of what taft would have said and huey long would have said. it is a -- for those of us on the left, it was a reaffirming speech. it was one that, where he underscored what he has been saying all along. there is a place for government. government does help a lot of people get places. we don't agree on that obviously, but -- >> dana: do you think that has s what he has been saying all along? if you compare the 2008 speech to this one, it's the same? >> bob: what i would say in this without sour grapes. in 2008 he tried to break across the gridlock and he didn't get anywhere so now he will go alone. >> eric: a lot of people on the right said he thinks he has a mandate because he was re-elected. his speech sounded like i have a mandate for the next term, the next four years. he talked about gay rights and climb change. weeping entitlement off the table. equal pay and immigration. those are things we'll
beginning for him because the first time around, he was elected based on what he promised to do. and this time around, he feels he was elected on what he has done and what he can do in the years to come. and there, you're looking, again, at the president's church. and, george, i wonder what you were thinking this morning when you woke up, about this day because it is a day that gives a president we know a chance to start again, for the country. >> everything stops. everything is new for at least a moment. and he has that clear shot to speak to the entire country. and it feels like the one day where the entire country has ears to hear what the president has to say, as well. >> and one we can show the world also listening. we can show the world that after a hard-fought election, a bruising time in congress, that we are still together in this country. and i believe we have jon karl, white house correspondent, with us. he is also there on the west side of the capitol. jon? >> reporter: diane, i'm here. the divisions, the president will be surrounded, of course, by family and friends
. the next two flags are the flags the u.s. adopted when the president elect's home state became part of the u.s. the middle flag represents the 50 states. president obama plus home state illinois entered the union and 18 -- in 1818, making it the 21st state to join the union. the two flags towards the center, they will display 21 stars. dole in new york, the independent line. -- joel in new york, the independent line. >> i love c-span. inauguration day is a proud day for every american, regardless of party affiliation. i want to address the first caller about poverty. i am a second-generation american, and if you cannot make in this country, you'll be doomed to failure in any other country. host: julie, salt lake city, good morning. caller: i want to thank you for taking my call. i lived in a completely republican state. thank goodness that president obama has prevailed, because i do believe that the majority of people, even though i do it in a republican state, a lot of them did vote for him. unfortunately, i wish we would get rid of the electoral vote and go to the popular vote. i
the video. we have 2014 coming up. we hope to elect many more women to the congress. if we did not have so many women in congress up till now, we would not have the first woman speaker of the house and. thank you to emily's list for that. listening to the shiloh baptist church choir and taking our lead from them, when i saw the video and heard them tell me that to 16, and our own hopes for two fourteen -- you ain't seen nothing yet. thank you, emily's list, for having women lead the way, for helping to change the playing field. a promise you this. but with emily's list is held, if we reduce the role of money and politics, overturn the citizens united and the rest, and increase the level of civility in politics, we will change the environment in which politics is conducted. we will elect many more women to public office. that is a very good thing for our country. thank you, emily's list. we are emily, and we ain't seen nothing yet. thank you all. [applause] >> a look at the jefferson memorial. president obama's public inauguration as tomorrow, which happens to be allocated. -- mlk day. [ind
of american freedom and democracy. for the 57th time in our history, a president freely elected by the people is being sworn in to office. just before noon at the capitol, barack obama will take the oath for his second term as president. this is a ceremonial swearing-in because the constitution requires the president to be sworn in on january 20th, and this year the 20th fell on sunday. so the president took the official oath in private yesterday in the blue room at the white house. the oath administered by the chief justice john roberts, jr. the public swearing-in and all the pomp and circumstance that go with it were put off until today and what a day it is. the temperature right now is in the high 30s. the sky is clear, a brilliant winter's day in the nation's capital. people are pouring into the national mall to witness a day of history. the first family began the day by attending services at st. john's church. that's right across the street from the white house. that's a long-standing tradition for presidents on inauguration day. joining me now in our cbs coverage is bob schieffer, our c
have a president who has been re-elected who knows this will be the last time he or she will ever do this, and they typically have something on their minds they want to say and they figure they're going to take the moment to do it, but by and large they're all better served if they can keep these things shorter rather than longer. >> don, did you write a short one for clinton's second inaugural? >> president clinton's second inaugural was longer than his first. it didn't stretch on and on, but i think we would have liked -- >> was that his fault or your fault? >> no comment, no comment. we would have liked to have been able to have another day for another edit, but it was a good speech, and, again, you know, they have something to say. president clinton in that case was talking about the 21st century and the millennium that we were moving towards and how he wanted america to come back together. he invoked scripture to talk about being the repairer of the breach. he wanted americans to really pull together during a time of great opportunity. >> and, of course, that was what was really
to do which is represent the people of the united states. we have a democratically elected republic and people need to pull out their history books and find out what that is and realize that when we send them to office, would give them the authority to vote the way we feel and if we feel they are not representing our opinions and needs, we need to replace them. thank you very much. host: stephen dinan will be joining us at the bottom of the hour. later, author and historian richard norton smith will dig in the details of the second term and what this president could be facing. this headline is from "the washington examiner" -- the public information officer for the u.s. capitol police is joining us on the fund. guest: for having me. host: we look at the seams around washington, what can visitors expect tomorrow? guest: they should expect that we will do our best to protect people. give time to get through lines and things of that nature. host: this is a map we found this morning in "the washington post." the area in red it will be the high-security area. many of the roads around the
that for all the purposes that people send us to congress or elect us to public office, whether it's county executive or a member of congress, is they expect us to do what is right for them when they are in most need of our help. many things we can do for ourselves, but some things are just beyond the most determined resourceful -- determined, resourceful, operational people can do and that is when a natural disaster strikes. so while we have had our conversations about what should be in the bill and how the bill should be bifurcated or in this case trifurcated and all the rest, when we have this vote today it will sweep away some of the concerns that people have about whether this assistance is going to actually show up. 79 days, 79 days since hurricane sandy struck the region. last year it was irene that struck much of the same area. some of the people haven't really fully recovered from that. whether it was the small business owner or homeowner or whatever, and now sandy. such a tremendous force. others have talked about, how do you mitigate for such a thing? how do you address issues re
. the challenge to us is to remember what we learned when we first entered this movement, that you never elect someone to make change happen for you. you elect somebody to make it a little easier for your movement to keep on making change after. and so, brothers and sisters, i implore you tonight, have a good time, party caressed well, then get right back on the battlefield tuesday morning because we took our democracy back and we ain't giving it up to nobody. thank you and god bless. fire it up. fire it up. fire it up! god bless you all. >> that was president of the naacp, benjamin jealous, speaking at the peace ball, voices of hope and resistance come here in washington, d.c. on sunday night. we will be back with more from the peace ball couldn't angela davis, sonia sanchez and others in a moment. ♪ [music break] >> sweet honey in the rock performing at the peace ball last night. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are broadcasting from washington, d.c., bringing you special coverage of today's inauguration as hundreds of thousands gath
. maybe roosevelt and hoover an example of that. franklin roosevelt had been elected by a landslide in 1932 over president hoover who was considered to be responsible for the great depression and roosevelt was a great schmoozer. finally, they reduced to looking at the super structure of thing it was the commerce department that was being built and roosevelt said, lovely steel. that was sort of the end of the conversation. the rest of the ride they went in silence. this happens much too often, but not on a second term. >> and david gregory, about a two-mile drive. >> and you remember in the modern era, george w. bush -- the language plate is -- >> yeah, the license plate just for a second here is a story. it's a -- kind of a protest legal local license plate here in washington, d.c. taxation without representation. the president has opted to use them on all the limousines. >> and that always comes up for presidents. >> d.c. has a delegate, a nonvoting member of congress. >> george w. bush met president clinton and they got along famously. they were swapping stories and how bush raise
and for the fact that it was the first time i was able to vote. i turned 21 on election day. as able to vote for kennedy that day. since then they changed the age to 18. since i started voting, i have plusssed 14 inauguration's the swearing in of lbj in dallas. it is something i would not miss for anything. one thing that impressed me so much was all the flag-waving in the crowd. i thought it was just beautiful. the music by james taylor. he was always one of my favorite. and the choir this thing be back on him. today the line about trampling out the grapes of wrath stuck with me. we have so much hatred today. i hope we can make some progress. host: i know you waited a long time. brandon is tweeting us. this is a beautiful day for our country. i'm going to find something good to do today. inauguration day is filled with many traditions. you just witnessed a signing ceremony. this happens in the presence room in the capital. you saw the president what the plans that are distributed to the leaders of congress. he also confirmed the nominations of john brennan it to be defense secretary appeare
it was unanimous that george washington had been elected president. the first thing they had to doffs notify washington he needed to come to take his oath of office. it took a little while for presidents of the united states in those days to get to wherever the federal government was so they had a couple of weeks to work things out. well the first thing they did was to write an oath for everybody else to take including the vice president of the united states. congress write it is oath that every other person who works for the government from military to judges to the legitimate tors. that is an oath written by congress and it's changed over the centuries. but the oath the president takes is unique. it's in the constitution and it's never changed. so the question was where are we going to swear in the president of the united states? well congress is meeting in federal hall on wall street. and it was a nice building. the house had the bigger room downstairs and the senate had the smaller room upstairs. and they said the president should be sworn in in our chamber. that was fine except everybod
a breath, threat leaders that have been elected do their jobs. nobody wants to pay anymore taxes. they take 38% out of my check every week in taxes. i get back maybe $1,000 if i'm lucky. the president has a lot on his plate. he is one man speaking for 600 million. how is that to get up in the morning and realize you have everybody in the entire united states looking for you to make the right choice. host: the population in the united states is 300 million. caller: i'm sorry, even 300 million, that's one man speaking for everybody. he's got to make the right decision every second of the day. that's impossible. the country -- the laws we have in place, they've been there. they do work, just everyone has to abide by the laws. everyone should be treated equally. hypothank you for your calls and comments. a tweet -- hypocoming -- host: coming up we'll be talking about the fiscal situation in their cities and the comments yesterday by vice president biden who addressed the 300 mares in attendance on guns and gun violence. and late ter president's promises, what did he fulfill in his first term. a
would hope they realize what i understood ebb when i first got elected in 1994. things like -- values like statesmanship and compromise and getting things done were values that people, you know, cherish. that doesn't mean we always got along, we had our battles. but i think the mayors are focused on results. the advise -- advice we would give them is you have a 12% approval rate. there is not much farther down you can go. the time is now to come together and tell a story about a congress that went from the do-nothing congress to a congress that is getting things done in the most pornt issues of our time. i think if they do, both parties will benefit and certainly, the nation will benefit. i say that as mon who needs to compromise on all of these issues. both parties need to understand that people are watching and they expect more from folks here on the beltway. >> when you compromise and you don't walk away with everything you wanted do you still feel like you are successful? >> all the time. you know -- i mean, i used to say they got elected too. the world was not made in my image. w
elections. you may also see a 2/3 majority vote in the senate and in the house if there is some kind of aggressive stance towards guns, because democratic constituents live in some of the most dangerous districts in america. host: a two-thirds vote to undo executive action? caller: if the democrats believe it will hurt their midterm elections, i could see that happening, because i had been getting phone calls from unhappy democrats that live in dangerous districts and they want to be able to protect themselves. host: why are you getting those phone calls? caller: i know democrats. democrats and not been talking about it on television. the house or senate members. it's because they have constituents that support and control, like harry reid's district, so it's a major issue. i believe the background checks at the gun shows, i believe that could pass congress without using executive action. but the fear is there for the people. george bush did it as well, but we have to relinquish the fear. i think, by going through congress and getting it passed by congress, it will be less drama and
, and they're not totally in love with his first term. he just beat his rival in the election. >> people have lower expectations, so i think we're going to -- he may try and raise that a little bit. this will be a lot of poetry, and the state of the union address is going to be the prose where he really lays out the agenda. >> let's bring in the auth aror the book "barack obama the story" and margaret hoover, republican consultant and cnn contributor. david, what are you expecting to hear? >> i think there's a paradox here, which is that four years ago there were huge crowds and so much ebullience of the moment. he gave such a wintry speech. today there's smaller crowds, i think he's giving a more optimistic speech. i think he feels he's in a much better place today than he was four years ago? >> cornell? >> i think we'll hear some of the things picked up from the campaign. he's got to talk about the economy, talk about the number one issue to americans, and that's jobs and expanding and growing the middle class. we're looking at a middle class that continues to shrink, and it's something tha
in the background, especially since the election. did he have any say in this or shaping of the policy? >> yes. paul ryan since he's come back to congress from the presidential trail has avoided taking questions and kind of kept his head down. but at this retreat he played a very important role in a couple ways. first of all, he was very active in leading discussions with the republicans when they were trying to decide what their strategy was, and he also came out and talked to reporters and kind of floated this idea of the short-term debt ceiling increase, and he was part of a group of five conservatives who blessed this deal on friday morning. jeb hencer ling of texas and steve of louisiana and jordan of ohio and ryan. so it remains to be seen whether that will be kind of a center of power going forward. host: as far as those five signing on to this deal, what's been talking about the members, especially on the republican side and -- will all of them go along with this? >> it's going to be tough for them, because they have to get 218 votes. the democrats have already signaled they are not going to
an office boy and get him elected to senate. other senators called him the senator from prendergast. he squeaks in to get reelected in 1940 and then they elevated him, not because he was qualified to be president, as emitted over and over again, but because he did not have a lot of enemies and he was very pliable. if wallace had been in there, there would have been no atomic bomb, and no nuclear arms race, and very possibly no cold war. wallace could see the world through the eyes of our adversaries. he understood the soviets. he understood the chinese. >> he was an anglophobe too. roosevelt was as well. he repeatedly told his son, we are not going to be played as a good time charlie as we were in world war i. >> he also campaigned with african americans at a time of jim crow, and went to africa. >> he was shocked. he said the british empire said these people back a hundred years. >> you made the movie born on the fourth of july. you made platoon. and now have written the untold history of the united states and done a showtime series. what is most important, do you feel, that has not be
years, so why this year? >> you know, i think it's because he is not running for re-election again, and doesn't have to worry about it, and you have to give credit where credit is due. people like mark phraugin, and he said it's symbolic, and if you don't do anything else it's symbolic, and he cornered me one day at a rally, and he asked me to bring it up to the president, and i did. and the president looked me straight in the eye and said i don't do symbolism. and i said this goes beyond symbolism. i think what it is, this president is a long-term thicker. he was not going to react then. he had an election coming up. and you get 9% of the vote from washingtons. >> and if the president is into symbolism, his so porters would say it shows that he is being driven in a vehicle that is addressing what many districts, we have no representation in congress and our tax dollars don't go and help us, and we have to do something about self government. and so from that start, supporters would hope that he would get more involved in the district of columbia affairs and push for representation
the election results, but your money is doing well. and "varney & company" is about to begin. >> new funds in the tech world, it's not apple. you're used to long lines outside apple stores and people clamoring to get apple's latest version of the smart phone or tablet. the new buzz out there is samsung, not apple. apple-like hype is building for the samsung galaxy smart phone, a bigger screen, faster speed, longer lasting battery. and launched in may, it was considered the first to meet or exceed. you keep hearing, apple doesn't meet cool anymore, that's samsung. and i wonder if apple is below 500. where are we? >> and the traders are not getting in and out. right at the 498 mark, not far off from 500. i can tell you that ubs says the next 100 point move should be to the upside. you're right, it really hasn't been doing too much. stuart: and the s&p 500, they're at a five-year high and people down there are happy, aren't they. >> they are, right? they're back to the pre-the financial crisis and and then you sell, your overbought. stuart: cheer up, people, there's good news out there. the m
is not the interim appointee, it's the election of a new senator in the special election. that's what we need to focus on. >> schieffer: i take it will be a democrat? >> it will be a democrat. the. >> pelley: governor patrick, thank you for joining us. we have in the capitol rotunda a very special guest today, valerie jarrett, senior advisor to the president and i day air is the person in washington who has known the president and first lady longest, being a long-time friend of both in chicago. ms. jarrett, great of you to be with us, thank you so much. >> it's a pleasure. it's a pleasure to be here. it's a terrific day for america. is. >> pelley: i have to believe that you were involved in the president's speech today. he must have run it by you. he runs nearly everything by you. >> (laughs) >> pelley: and i wonder. >> what do you any the president wanted us to take from that speech? one thing that was the take-home message? >> well, i think part of what he wanted to do today is to lay out the vision of our founding fathers as basic values of principals that guide us and so what i heard when
, at the 16th of january, we have 28 finally deaths. when i became mayor, when i first put my election, and mexico the term is usually three years. my state is the only state that lasts for years. we decided we needed to change the model and made that a partnership and assign the retired general to become chief of police. a couple of months into the new administration, we had the police force, police officers didn't want to work with the general. and of course we were wondering if it had to do some with low wages for the betterment of the working conditions. the strike was orchestrated and they didn't want to work under a military chief. we have to take a very tough decision because there was something totally out of our hands. what we did is we decided to fire and to disappear the police officer department. of course after they heard i had taken the decision to disappear, they decided to go back to work and we justify one condition. you can go back to work if you do three things. number one. number two coming take a polygraph and number three can be said that due to an economic invest
back, fdr broke the unwritten code of serving more than two terms. he was elected to four terms. in today's modern age, could we have more than two terms for any president? guest: great question. >> you worked for ronald reagan. if his health was better, of course, would he have run for a third term? guest: i doubt it. he talked about it after he left office. he was going to campaign for appeal of that amendment. he thought the american people should be able to vote for anyone wanted to vote for. it is very difficult to imagine after eight years of office -- we've used up our presidents. that is why this string of two- term presidents is really so unusual. we have a string of one-term presidencies before that. that became the norm. host: let me share with ronald reagan said in january of 1987. state of union address. there was the iran-contra sc andal. [video clip] >> i have one major regret. i took a risk with our action in regards to iran. it did not work. for that, i accept full responsibility. it was not wrong to try to save lives. certainly, it was not wrong to try to secur
personally. when he won election four years ago, he made history as the first african-american president, still so many, it only happened because the country was so mad at george w. bush, that any democrat would have won. it's a personal validation for barack obama. as president and as a person and as a politician. is he any different? he went through four tough years. he came into town thinking with a democratic majority thinking he could get almost anything done. his signature initiative is that health care reform. it wasn't easy. he wasn't able to get much else big done. how does he play his hand in a second term? we've seen some minor acts leading up to the bigger plays, the fiscal cliff and the negotiations. the biggest problem in washington is there is a trust deficit. republicans blame the president, the president and the democrats blame republicans for that. he's the singular leader of the country. we can all debate that. he needs to find a way to break it and start a second term. >> he joked because his drawers teenagers and want to spend less time with him and he may have more
that she is not the most electable democrat. with two or three people on the other side. what do you make of that? >> the question is can we get beyond the gridlock that we experienced during the 1990's? who was in the best position to point forward? part of the reason, when i have said, should we do this race? we had three questions. could our families survive it? since my wife is exceptional and our children is above -- are above average, it would work. is there something i can do that no other candidate can do? what i believe is the country is ready to get beyond the old arguments we have been having since the 1960's about vietnam and the sexual revolution and the role of faith. all these things we have been arguing about. the american people have moved beyond that. that is what you see consistently that among independents and republicans, we do very well. when we get these big crowds i am always shaking hands afterwards and i have folks, "i am a republican but i support you." i lean over and say, "thank you, but where we whispering -- why are we whispering?" it has less about the posi
precinct. >> yeah, he wasn't intimidating anybody. >> stephanie: who? >> caller: the last election when there were a couple of them out there with their clubs and intimidating people -- >> where was this? >> caller: but that's okay. >> where was this? >> caller: the last voting. >> stephanie: how about the anti-obama gathering where they are all armed? that is not intimidating? why are they all armed at tea party rallies? >> caller: well, you shouldn't threaten anybody. but they did the same thing with bush. >> stephanie: what do you mean? what did they do to bush? >> caller: obama for some reason -- this guy -- yeah he's the president, but he knows nothing, he blames everybody -- >> huh? >> caller: he is not a professional man. he doesn't speak well -- >> stephanie: president obama? >> he speaks a lot better than you do. [overlapping speakers] >> stephanie: mary the criticism of most people on the right is that he is too good of speaker, right? he is just slick -- >> caller: no, he is not slick. >> stephanie: he is not a good speaker? >> caller: no, he likes to talk w
more than just an election. right? if the n.r.a.'s got a list, then obama for america has a bigger list. >> cenk: i like that. >> i love that line. >> cenk: him saying ok, you've got a list, you think you've got a list, you want to see a list. second of all we've been saying the president should make his case throughout his first term. here he is aggressively making his case. >> there's no politics for him here. he's not running for anything else. he can go out there speak to the people to the congress. of course then, there are the republicans. he has to run into the republicans, he has to run into the crazies. as helpful as the n.r.a. is when a president tries to restrict gun rights, it is just as helpful to the people like the brady campaign and people who are fighting guns when they see some of these crazy people like we see in marco rubio. >> does he really think banning assault weapons is going to stop mass murder? >> he believe that is, i think he believes in this and thinks this is huge. >> he's not a hypocrite he really believes his public policy. >> i think the president is no
. >> my colleague and i went to chicago. this was in the midst of the election and picked up opposition research prepared by jack ryan, obama's onetime republican senate point. he found all this information. the way he frames it, and i think it's probably right, is that obama was always very soft on crime but very tough on guns. every time obama had a crime vote to take when he was in the illinois state senate, he always voted "present" because he didn't want to -- for two reasons. one, he said that criminal law disproportionately affected african-americans. he saw a racial component there. additionally, he said i don't want to clog the court system with all these cases. what do you want to clog the court system with? we thought given his rhetoric on guns lately it would be interesting to bring up this vote where he said i don't want to give tougher prosecution to children who shoot in schools. >>steve: you look at chicago, one of the murder capitals of the world. nothing the president proposed the other day would crack down on handgun violence in chicago. there is one other thing we wa
and medicaid fantastic. that's why he won the election, and he's repeating it again. but look at the reaction. in the middle of that speech he's negotiating with the republicans on possibly reducing medicare medicaid and possibly reducing social security. i'll judge him by his actions not on his words, even though they were great today. final one classic president obama, and what he emphasizeed throughout the campaign, for better or for worse, i like the words. let's see if he follows through on action. here he is again. >> obama: fidelity to our found founding principles requires new responses to our new challenges, preserveing individual freedom ultimately requires collective action. now more than ever we must do these things together as one nation, one people. my fellow americans we are made for this moment, and we will see so long as we seize it together. >> cenk: this moment, i hope so. i hope we can seize it together. the republicans, of course, have not always been willing to work together. that's not how president obama deals with it. that's an interesting topic one that we'll discuss
to grow this economy and put people back to work. and despite that conversation, and despite the election results, the position that's been taken on the part of some house republicans is that, "no, we've got to do it our way, and if we don't, we simply won't pay america's bills." well, that can't be a position that is sustainable over time. it's not one that's good for the economy now. bes certainly not going to the kind of precedent that i want to establish not just for my presidency, but for future presidents, even if it was on the other side. democrats don't like voting for the debt ceiling when a republican is president, and yet you -- but you never saw a situation in which democrats suggested somehow that we would go ahead and default if we didn't get 100 percent of our way. that's just not how it's supposed to work. jon karl. >> thank you, mr. president. on the issue of guns, given how difficult it will be -- some would say impossible -- to get any gun control measure passed through this congress, what are you willing or able to do, using the powers of your presidency, to act withou
the election in november." well, those fears that democratic leaders had back then were realizeized in november. this time, democratic leaders do plan to proceed a little more carefully. senate majority leader harry reid has already told his hometown pbs station that he doesn't plan to go with what he called gyrations to pass any legislation, make senators vote for any legislation which can't get through the republican-controlled house. and guess what, folks, the house is going to be a challenge. >> people in kansas are not looking for new laws out of washington. they're looking for more involvement in their communities, and their families at the state level. >> these gun control measures that have been reported in the news are extreme and they're antithetical to the spirit of liberty. >> we want all tools available to use, including the impeachment. he's even using children. it reminds me of saddam hussein when he used kids. >> how the white house and how democrats on capitol hill pushing the various pieces of legislation, what do they emphasize. we can tell you this, the one they know is goin
manager for barack obama, was whipping up the crowd, pumping his fist. when you win the election, this is what you get y. >> you saw the president's half-sister sitting in the first row. you've got a lot of family. a lot of friends. these are really -- when we talk about vip, these are the vip of the vip. >> last year, four years ago, i was in the exact same location. and it was so cold that even though it was a very coveted seat, the people who were not in behind that glass and not in the heated area, they were taking off pretty soon. but told it's nice. everybody's filling their seats. the weather is comfortable. >> still making his way along the department of treasury over there. pretty soon, that limo's going to be making a left turn. coming up, right behind the white house on to the -- right in front of the reviewing stand. the president will go into the white house. and then maybe they'll freshen up a little bit before they go out to the reviewing stand. >> it's always such a special moment when the president and the first lady get out of the beast, the limousine. >> they'r
, people who are bureaucrats, people who are elected officials -- anyone. you cannot have a two tiered system where half of the people that are just civilians have to abide by the laws and everybody else does not. one of the most important factors that each firearm as the president said is being traced. it has to be done at every level. there is nothing to stop a bad cop -- let's say there is one cop who is bad that can stop a criminal with a stolen gun and give it to a friend, keep it, or trade it. all of these firearms, if they are going to go into the process of tree's ability, then it has to be seamless and transparent. no. two, the high-capacity magazines that everybody castigates so strongly, let me tell you something. if you live in a bad area, an area where there are gang members that cruise by your neighborhood all of the time, you do not want to be stuck with a single barrel shotgun or a single shot shotgun. you need to have the ability to protect your family and your friends and your neighbors. as a result of that -- began does not shoot people, you shoot people. -- the gun
would week after the election news see the state with the highest poverty rate in the nation is california even higher than the district of columbia. that should be a warning to progressives who maintain the big government model is the path of to prosperity. we argue it is the opposite. texas is a model of how america could be better ride and more prosperity with less government. john: texas gained more than 1 million jobs by paul krugman says in the "new york times" what is of a texas miracle? the employee rate was eight-point to%. that is not great but california was 11.8%. >> they had over 10 percent unemployment every month of brock obamacare presidency until last november. john: still 3 percent higher than texas. >> higher than the national average every month since 1980. john: regulation? >> a huge difference. it was so bad in california the democrats allowed the lot to be passed that sought to find the cost of regulations on small business. arnold schwarzenegger was so embarrassed he did not wanted to come out. be average cost is $133,000 per year with. the legislature
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